No Rest for the Wicked: Enchanted Brush 2017 is Positively Villainous

No Rest for the Wicked: Enchanted Brush 2017 is Positively Villainous

Did Findlay’s friendly butter flake roll maven actually transform into something evil? Visit the third-annual Enchanted Brush exhibition, curated by the Mazza Museum’s Dan Chudzinski, at the University of Findlay to see for yourself.

Villains are the theme of the public show, now open in UF’s Dudley and Mary Marks Lea Gallery through Aug. 4; the exhibit will then travel to the Marathon Performing Arts Center, where it will remain through the first week of October.

The show features 20 artists who were invited to create original artwork based upon their most indelible villains from their childhoods. With few parameters, the artists were asked to submit pieces using whichever mediums they wished. Chudzinski, himself an accomplished artist, included one of his works based on the Evil Queen from the fable “Snow White.” Visitors might notice a familiar face in his mixed-media submission – Kelley McClurkin, who co-owns and operates Bread Kneads bakeries and delis, served as the model.

Other works include frightful characters such as Medusa, and the Cyclops in Homer’s “Odyssey.” More pieces, and a “villains’ lair,” will be added to the exhibit during it’s two-month run at the University.

The Enchanted Brush exhibit has become one of the most anticipated and popular summer Lea Gallery events. Chudzinski, whose interest in fantasy-based learning has added an adventurous and mythological flavor to Mazza Museum offerings and displays for patrons of all ages, said last year’s Enchanted Brush, which featured a jungle theme, resulted in some works that went on to win international competitions.

The Museum can be “a place that influences the creation of art more than we already do,” and this annual exhibit does just that, Chudzinski said. The exhibit also affords Mazza the opportunity to showcase works from contemporary artists that have been and are culturally influential. For instance, this year’s pieces have come from artists who have worked and currently contract with companies such as Pixar and HBO.

Some pieces will be for sale. Rather than the Museum collecting a commission, each artist will earn all the profit. “This is really a celebration of artists,” Chudzinski explained.

Admission to the Lea Gallery, located in the Virginia B. Gardner Fine Arts Pavilion, is free. Gallery hours are from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. daily.

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